For more Arctos videos, see the Tutorial Quick Bites and Webinar pages.

 


Arctos: Creating an Accession

 


Arctos: Data Entry Catalog Example

 


Arctos: Data Entry Screen Customization

 


Arctos: Webinar on Data Entry and Bulkloading

Arctos: Webinar on Introduction to Arctos for Bird and Egg/Nest Collections

 


Taking and Labeling Tissues

The method of tissue preservation depends on the goals of the study, logistics of transport, and permit restrictions. Imports from countries that are listed as having highly pathogenic avian influenza must be preserved and treated in specific ways. It is important to know the regulations and discuss preservation methods with a Curator in advance of planning fieldwork. For more information, see our Tissue Guidelines.

The following brief video shows how to label and barcode tissue vials for the MVZ collections. It also provides some guidance on the types and order of tissues preserved (example is for birds; the types of tissues preserved may differ among collections).

Arctos: Filter Search by Geography

Study skins that were collected in California are installed organized first by taxonomy, then by geography. The specimens are installed in a north-to-south, west-to-east arrangement so that variations in phenotype over geography, if present, may be more easily observed. The counties within California have been prearranged in a specific order for MVZ installation (see above). But how do we determine which skins are more north or more west than any other skin? If the specimens have been georeferenced, Arctos has a mapping function that makes this process relatively easy.
As an example, let’s install study skins of Cyanocitta stelleri frontalis from Calaveras County. From the main Search page in Arctos:
    1. Within Identifiers, select a Collection to search. Click the small arrows to expand the menu, then click the check box next to the desired collection(s). For this example, we’d select Bird specimens (MVZ:Bird).
    2. Within Identification and Taxonomy, type the scientific name into the Any taxon, ID, common name field. For this example, type in Cyanocitta stelleri frontalis.
    3. Within Locality, type the county into the County field. If the county has a common name found in multiple states (e.g., Orange County) you may also wish to type in the state to the State/Province field. We’ll type in Calaveras County.
    4. Within Specimen Record, type skin into the Part Name field. This will ensure that non-skin specimens (e.g., skeletons, fluids) will not appear in the search results.
    5. Click Search.
    6. On the next page there will be a drop-down menu that says Tools: Map, Customize, or Download. Use the drop-down menu to select Mapping Tools >> Map results in BerkeleyMapper.
Use the generated map to arrange all of the skins within the searched county. Click on the colored dots on the map to view the MVZ catalog numbers.
When attempting to identify specimens to subspecies by geographic distribution, it is helpful to see which subspecies identifications have been used in different counties.
To return a filtered scientific name search displaying all possible counties:
    1. To the right of the Search button near the top of the page is See results as followed by a drop-down menu. From the menu, select Specimen Summary.
    2. A new drop-down menu will appear called Group by. Scroll down the menu and click the box next to County.
    3. Within Identifiers select a Collection to search. Click the small arrows to expand the menu, then click the box next to Bird specimens (MVZ:Bird).
    4. Within Identification and Taxonomy, type the scientific name into the Any taxon, ID, common name field.
    5. Within Specimen Record, type skin into the Part Name field. This will ensure that non-skin parts (e.g., skeletons, fluid specimens) will not be displayed on the generated map.
    6. Click Search.
The next page will display a list of all counties in which study skins for the scientific name exist. Click on a blue specimens link next to a county name to generate that county’s page of specimen records.